flutey

Posted by dashjkehjklw on February 15, 2017
Uncategorized / No Comments

If you have the time, you should definitely travel. It will expand your mind in ways you can’t imagine . It will help you to experience reality in its truest.

Blake Lively Calls BS On Hollywood Beauty Standards

Posted by dashjkehjklw on February 15, 2017
Uncategorized / No Comments

Blake Lively isn’t one for facades, especially now that she is a mom. 

Yes, Lively is a genetically blessed actress who is currently the face of beauty brand L’Oreal, but she keeps it real when it comes to the expectations on women. 

“We have really unrealistic beauty standards and beauty norms,” Lively told Refinery29. “What you’re seeing on red carpets and in magazines takes a lot of effort and a lot of people. People don’t understand that it’s all very constructed. What little girls are seeing isn’t what [these celebrities] look like when they wake up in the morning — even though it’s no less beautiful.”

The star has been open about sharing a look behind the curtain, regularly posting photos on her Instagram of her prep process with her glam team. 

I did not wake up like this. Thank you @rodortega4hair @kristoferbuckle @enamelle @lorealmakeup @lorealhair

A post shared by Blake Lively (@blakelively) on

…I clearly don’t deserve this special treatment.

A post shared by Blake Lively (@blakelively) on

Now, as mom to daughters James, 2, and Ines, 4 months, she is even more conscious of imagery that perpetuates these falsehoods. 

“There’s this awareness of what they’re going to be exposed to and what they grow up seeing,” says Lively. “For me, it’s important for my daughters to know that it’s not real life. They’re seeing me dressed up in all this hair and makeup, but they also see me without that. I want them to see both sides, because there is never just one side.”

Off the red carpet, Lively usually just wears “sunscreen, tinted moisturizer and nothing else really,” she told British Vogue last year. Keeping it real, for sure. 

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.http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2017/02/15/blake-lively-hollywood-beauty-daughters_n_14775484.html
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Blake Lively isn’t one for facades, especially now that she is a mom. 

Yes, Lively is a genetically blessed actress who is currently the face of beauty brand L’Oreal, but she keeps it real when it comes to the expectations on women. 

“We have really unrealistic beauty standards and beauty norms,” Lively told Refinery29. “What you’re seeing on red carpets and in magazines takes a lot of effort and a lot of people. People don’t understand that it’s all very constructed. What little girls are seeing isn’t what [these celebrities] look like when they wake up in the morning — even though it’s no less beautiful.”

The star has been open about sharing a look behind the curtain, regularly posting photos on her Instagram of her prep process with her glam team. 

I did not wake up like this. Thank you @rodortega4hair @kristoferbuckle @enamelle @lorealmakeup @lorealhair

A post shared by Blake Lively (@blakelively) on

…I clearly don’t deserve this special treatment.

A post shared by Blake Lively (@blakelively) on

Now, as mom to daughters James, 2, and Ines, 4 months, she is even more conscious of imagery that perpetuates these falsehoods. 

“There’s this awareness of what they’re going to be exposed to and what they grow up seeing,” says Lively. “For me, it’s important for my daughters to know that it’s not real life. They’re seeing me dressed up in all this hair and makeup, but they also see me without that. I want them to see both sides, because there is never just one side.”

Off the red carpet, Lively usually just wears “sunscreen, tinted moisturizer and nothing else really,” she told British Vogue last year. Keeping it real, for sure. 

type=type=RelatedArticlesblockTitle=Related… + articlesList=57eebd30e4b0972364deb2b0,57684fcae4b0853f8bf1d547,560c0499e4b0768127000e75

– This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

Toshiba chairman quits over nuclear loss

Posted by dashjkehjklw on February 14, 2017
Uncategorized / No Comments

Shigenori Shiga steps down as the Japanese company reports a multi-billion dollar loss..http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-38965380
higenori Shiga steps down as the Japanese company reports a multi-billion dollar loss.

My Relationship With Gifts

Posted by dashjkehjklw on February 13, 2017
Uncategorized / No Comments

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/gramma-good/my-relationship-with-gift_b_14719462.html

2017-02-13-1486992015-2328781-download.jpeg

I love buying gifts for others more than I love receiving them for myself. I enjoy analyzing the mind of the person who is going to receive it, tying in the particular occasion and thinking of their own taste and lifestyle.

In my mind, shopping for people is a big deal and I kid you not, one of my favorite pastimes.

Purchasing gifts for family, friends and acquaintances brings great happiness to the receiver if you, the purchaser, take your time to deliver a ‘gift to be remembered.’ It does not have to be expensive, but it should come from the heart.

Gift giving is a skill. It is playing detective and getting into the minds of those you love. Just remember, your enclosure card is as important, if not more so, than the physical gift.

With Valentine’s Day approaching, I decided to share a few gifts I have bought my ultimate concierge throughout the years. Each had a special touch, making it a ‘gift to remember.’

“Every day is Valentine’s Day,” according to my husband, Sheldon Good. I smile to myself and know he is right. Saying ‘I love you’ 365 days of the year acknowledges our love for one another, but in my mind February 14 is the frosting on the cake!

Let’s go shopping for Valentine’s Day with Honey:

Louis Vuitton Credit Card Case: I romanticized this gift by placing a folded two dollar bill inside with a handwritten ‘good luck’ note alongside the date in red ink. (You can purchase these bills at the bank.)

Hermes Tie: Hermes creates ties with designs that provoke memories, making it a ‘gift to remember.’ One year I gave Shelly a tie with lions in a jungle setting alongside a card that read: “You will always be the king of my jungle.”

Barneys Paperweight: Beautiful paperweights are both useful and thoughtful. You can find them with a meaningful saying or a wonderful design. Shelly’s paperweight has his zodiac sign on it and it sits on his desk. My card read: “I am so blessed you were born.”

Mova International Globe: This gift is ‘out of this world.’ Sitting on three pieces of Lucite, it revolves all on its own. It is simply marvelous. My card read: “Always see your world with rose colored glasses.”

– Bike: This gift allows us to spend time together. I had one and now that he does too, we ride “together.” Some men value time spent with their wives or significant others over gifts, so think of activities you can enjoy ‘in tandem.’

2017-02-13-1486992158-2625090-download1.jpeg

You know your special partner, so think about what will make him happy. It is a great reward to find that perfect gift for the one you love.

I love to share my personal gift recommendations. So if you think your guy would enjoy one of these gifts I found for my guy, be my guest. I would be overjoyed!

– This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

Missing KKK Leader Found Shot To Death Near Missouri River

Posted by dashjkehjklw on February 13, 2017
Uncategorized / No Comments

The body of a Ku Klux Klan leader who was reported missing last week was found Saturday near a Missouri river, according to multiple media outlets. 

Frank Ancona, 51, who was an imperial wizard of the Traditionalist American Knights near St. Louis, was found with a gunshot wound to his head, the Daily Journal reported, citing the results of an autopsy performed Sunday.

His wife, Malissa Ancona, allegedly told investigators that she last saw him when he was called to make an out-of-state delivery for work on Wednesday.

Local authorities, however, found that Ancona hadn’t received such a call. His employer reported him missing when he didn’t show up for work on Friday, according to local outlet KMOV.

Ancona’s vehicle was found in Federal Forest Service Property on Thursday, according to local authorities. The discovery wasn’t reported as suspicious because a missing persons report had not been filed at the time, KMOV reported. Police searched the surrounding area the following day, but did not find anything substantial. 

A family fishing along Big River near Belgrade found the body along the riverbed on Saturday, the Washington County Sheriff’s Office said.

Sheriff Zach Jacobsen called Ancona’s death a “tragic and senseless act of violence.”

A later search of Ancona’s home in Leadwood uncovered a number of anomalies, according to local reports

A safe inside the home had reportedly been pried open, possibly with a crowbar. Although its contents had been emptied, the Daily Journal reported that Leadwood Police Chief William Dickey said authorities don’t believe a burglar had broken into it. 

All but one of Ancona’s firearms were also missing. Malissa Ancona said her husband took them with him when he left on Wednesday, Dickey said. Members of his family who live next door reportedly said Ancona wouldn’t have done this.

Dickey said police also questioned Malissa about a Facebook post she wrote the day she says her husband left. It announced she needed a roommate, and she reportedly told authorities she had written the post because her husband had told her he planned to file for divorce and that  she’d need help covering rent. 

The investigation remains ongoing.

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http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2017/02/12/kkk-leader-found-dead_n_14712124.html

‘La La Land’ Wins BAFTA’s Top Prize, Continuing Its Hot Streak On The Road To The Oscars

Posted by dashjkehjklw on February 13, 2017
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Musical “La La Land” won big at Britain’s main film awards on Sunday as it scooped the prize for best film, while Emma Stone and Damien Chazelle picked up awards for best actress and best director respectively.

It won five gongs in total to keep its hot streak in the movie awards season going before the Oscars later this month, as it also picked up awards for cinematography and original music.

A throwback musical about an aspiring actress and a jazz pianist who are trying to make their way in Hollywood, “La La Land” had been nominated for 11 British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA) awards. Its success follows on from the Golden Globes, where it picked up seven awards.

However, co-star Ryan Gosling lost the best actor nod to Casey Affleck, for his performance in family drama “Manchester by the Sea”.

Kenneth Lonergan’s screenplay won “Manchester by the Sea” a second award.

Viola Davis took home the prize for best supporting actress for her performance in “Fences”, an adaption of a Pulitzer Prize winning play about the life of a black family in 1950s Pennsylvania.

And in a popular pick among the audience in the Royal Albert Hall, Londoner Dev Patel, 26, won best supporting actor for his performance in “Lion”, which charts the real-life story of an Indian boy adopted by an Australian couple.

(Reporting by Alistair Smout; Editing by Larry King)

– This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2017/02/12/la-la-land-bafta_n_14712204.html

Living in the Time of Trump

Posted by dashjkehjklw on February 05, 2017
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2017-02-04-1486248276-6160769-ScreenShot20170204at2.44.02PM.png

Around my house, I’m the source of near-constant mockery for my ability to be nostalgic for virtually anything that happened before right now. If the topic is even remotely related to “Encino in the 70’s”, apparently I not only have written eight articles about it, but I manage to even describe gas lines, smog alerts, Skylab and the Hillside Strangler in sepia-hued tones, like I’m a walking Ken Burns documentary in Puma sneakers. Okay, it’s true that in the 80’s I was obsessed with the 60’s, so much that I planned some of my outfits by studying old Byrds album covers. And in the 80’s, like ’86, I was already throwing ’80’s Night” parties, heavy on Dexy’s Midnight Runners and Toni Basil and Men Without Hats. As if these were songs from a bygone jukebox, not the radio three years earlier.

So, it should come as little surprise that I’ve been feeling awfully nostalgic lately. Nostalgic for a time when America was a beacon for all nations, a symbol of tolerance, inclusion, decency and basic goodness. I miss my country, one that welcomed the underdog and protected the most vulnerable. That not only elected, but re-elected it’s first African-American President. A nation that made a woman a major party standard-bearer like it was no big deal. A nation that repudiated “don’t ask, don’t tell” and embraced marriage equality. A nation that extended healthcare to 20 million citizens who didn’t previously have it, including those with pre-existing conditions. A nation that adheres to its treaties and alliances. And one that supports its allies and holds its enemies accountable. Not vice versa.

In short, I am tremendously nostalgic for the America of 3 weeks ago. It seems like a lifetime ago, as if it were something out of a history book. It feels like a national Brigadoon– we can’t even be sure it ever really happened.

I, like over half the country, am struggling to adapt to the new normal. Because nothing about it is normal or precedented in American history. I don’t mean to be too glib, but it’s violently disorienting to sit back and watch someone destroy your country. How do I root for my nation when I’m fundamentally resistant to its policies and its leadership? And how do I look anyone in the eye who supports it? There was a time when I couldn’t understand how a kind-hearted human could root for the Yankees or Patriots. But this is like rooting for the Nazis. This is embracing a cabal out to destroy democratic norms and the pillars of a constitutional democracy.

I’m not an alarmist or a conspiracist or a particularly rabid partisan. I rarely posted about politics before this election. And I’ve always been capable of seeing decent public servants on both sides of the aisle. But this isn’t about partisanship. This is a coup, plain and simple. It is a mad power grab through executive orders of people hell-bent on bypassing all other branches of government. They are out to discredit “so-called judges” and “fake news.” Basically, anyone seeking to enforce traditional democratic accountability and stop them from imposing their mean-spirited, unconstitutional agenda. One that aims to punish the least powerful and least popular.

I don’t know if anyone else is feeling this–I’m too depressed to ask–but I find it bizarre to go about my day-to-day life as if nothing tragic is concurrently happening. Like I can’t even check my phone to update UCLA football recruiting without getting a new alert of some other basic civil liberty being curtailed by rash, ill-thought-out executive fiat.

Think about it. Before the election, my biggest worries were of the variety of “will I find a parking spot at Trader Joes?”, “Will the Bachelor choose Ashley T. or will she be the next Bachelorette?'” And of course the perennial, “Will my pilot be picked up?”, “Whose pilot was picked up?” and “Why the fuck do those hacks keep getting pilots picked up?” Today, my worries are more of the “is this a full Fascist takeover or just one with strong authoritarian tendencies?” Frankly, I never thought that having schadenfreude against overrated, well-coiffed sitcom writers would be the good old days. But it sure beats existential concerns about a heartless, narcissist mad man having control of the nuclear codes and Supreme Court appointments.

2017-02-04-1486248484-8063636-ScreenShot20170204at2.46.37PM.png

2017-02-04-1486248545-7431840-ScreenShot20170204at2.46.54PM.png

2017-02-04-1486248653-262538-ScreenShot20170204at2.47.05PM.png

Lately, I’ve been overcome by free-floating anxiety and my sense of dread and foreboding is unprecedented. Or to use the parlance of the POTUS, “unpresidented.” Every minute of every day feels like the pit-in-your-stomach moment in a horror movie where the unsuspecting dupe walks back in and says “there’s no one in the garage” and second later stops a Samurai sword with his forehead. At all times, I feel the constant need to do something. And equally potent, countervailing thought that nothing I can do will make any difference. Firing off fifty tweets about Steve Bannon’s appearance and apparent Jew-hating won’t make much substantive difference. That said, it does feel pretty good.

And for friends of mine who bemoan that Facebook has gotten too political and should return to pictures of cats and people bragging about their ski trips, grow up. Sticking your head in the sand may work if you’re an ostrich, but not if you are an empathetic, concerned grown-up human being. Which is not to say, I don’t also enjoy your cat pictures. If you can get your feline to play the Hammond Organ, I may even share them.

Last Sunday night, after a weekend of visiting old high school friends, taking pictures of my daughter before her winter formal and seeing Rent for the first time, I was sitting on my couch watching the Pro Bowl. Now mind you, there is almost no football game I won’t watch in its entirety. Same with futbol games. But on this night, I got hit with a wicked case of the shpilkes. It didn’t feel appropriate that others were at airports around the country fighting the Muslim Ban while I loafed about watching Kirk Cousins in an exhibition game. To me, the only thing less American than discriminating by nationality is prioritizing by religion. And American Hitler’s Muslim Ban manages to do both. So I got in the car and drove to LAX. It took me two and a half hours before I could park and join my voice of dissent with the hundreds already there. But other than nearly needing to pee in a Dasani bottle while driving by the Southwest terminal, I’m glad I went.

In Trump’s America. free time may not seem free, as long as freedoms are perpetually under attack. More of our leisure time may be spent calling congressman and signing petitions and attending rallies. But ultimately, that’s a small price to pay for trying to make American great again. Or, as great as it already was three weeks ago.

– This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

.http://www.huffingtonpost.com/bryan-behar/living-in-the-time-of-tru_b_14620670.html
a href=”http://images.huffingtonpost.com/2017-02-04-1486248276-6160769-ScreenShot20170204at2.44.02PM.png”>2017-02-04-1486248276-6160769-ScreenShot20170204at2.44.02PM.png

Around my house, I’m the source of near-constant mockery for my ability to be nostalgic for virtually anything that happened before right now. If the topic is even remotely related to “Encino in the 70’s”, apparently I not only have written eight articles about it, but I manage to even describe gas lines, smog alerts, Skylab and the Hillside Strangler in sepia-hued tones, like I’m a walking Ken Burns documentary in Puma sneakers. Okay, it’s true that in the 80’s I was obsessed with the 60’s, so much that I planned some of my outfits by studying old Byrds album covers. And in the 80’s, like ’86, I was already throwing ’80’s Night” parties, heavy on Dexy’s Midnight Runners and Toni Basil and Men Without Hats. As if these were songs from a bygone jukebox, not the radio three years earlier.

So, it should come as little surprise that I’ve been feeling awfully nostalgic lately. Nostalgic for a time when America was a beacon for all nations, a symbol of tolerance, inclusion, decency and basic goodness. I miss my country, one that welcomed the underdog and protected the most vulnerable. That not only elected, but re-elected it’s first African-American President. A nation that made a woman a major party standard-bearer like it was no big deal. A nation that repudiated “don’t ask, don’t tell” and embraced marriage equality. A nation that extended healthcare to 20 million citizens who didn’t previously have it, including those with pre-existing conditions. A nation that adheres to its treaties and alliances. And one that supports its allies and holds its enemies accountable. Not vice versa.

In short, I am tremendously nostalgic for the America of 3 weeks ago. It seems like a lifetime ago, as if it were something out of a history book. It feels like a national Brigadoon– we can’t even be sure it ever really happened.

I, like over half the country, am struggling to adapt to the new normal. Because nothing about it is normal or precedented in American history. I don’t mean to be too glib, but it’s violently disorienting to sit back and watch someone destroy your country. How do I root for my nation when I’m fundamentally resistant to its policies and its leadership? And how do I look anyone in the eye who supports it? There was a time when I couldn’t understand how a kind-hearted human could root for the Yankees or Patriots. But this is like rooting for the Nazis. This is embracing a cabal out to destroy democratic norms and the pillars of a constitutional democracy.

I’m not an alarmist or a conspiracist or a particularly rabid partisan. I rarely posted about politics before this election. And I’ve always been capable of seeing decent public servants on both sides of the aisle. But this isn’t about partisanship. This is a coup, plain and simple. It is a mad power grab through executive orders of people hell-bent on bypassing all other branches of government. They are out to discredit “so-called judges” and “fake news.” Basically, anyone seeking to enforce traditional democratic accountability and stop them from imposing their mean-spirited, unconstitutional agenda. One that aims to punish the least powerful and least popular.

I don’t know if anyone else is feeling this–I’m too depressed to ask–but I find it bizarre to go about my day-to-day life as if nothing tragic is concurrently happening. Like I can’t even check my phone to update UCLA football recruiting without getting a new alert of some other basic civil liberty being curtailed by rash, ill-thought-out executive fiat.

Think about it. Before the election, my biggest worries were of the variety of “will I find a parking spot at Trader Joes?”, “Will the Bachelor choose Ashley T. or will she be the next Bachelorette?'” And of course the perennial, “Will my pilot be picked up?”, “Whose pilot was picked up?” and “Why the fuck do those hacks keep getting pilots picked up?” Today, my worries are more of the “is this a full Fascist takeover or just one with strong authoritarian tendencies?” Frankly, I never thought that having schadenfreude against overrated, well-coiffed sitcom writers would be the good old days. But it sure beats existential concerns about a heartless, narcissist mad man having control of the nuclear codes and Supreme Court appointments.

2017-02-04-1486248484-8063636-ScreenShot20170204at2.46.37PM.png

2017-02-04-1486248545-7431840-ScreenShot20170204at2.46.54PM.png

2017-02-04-1486248653-262538-ScreenShot20170204at2.47.05PM.png

Lately, I’ve been overcome by free-floating anxiety and my sense of dread and foreboding is unprecedented. Or to use the parlance of the POTUS, “unpresidented.” Every minute of every day feels like the pit-in-your-stomach moment in a horror movie where the unsuspecting dupe walks back in and says “there’s no one in the garage” and second later stops a Samurai sword with his forehead. At all times, I feel the constant need to do something. And equally potent, countervailing thought that nothing I can do will make any difference. Firing off fifty tweets about Steve Bannon’s appearance and apparent Jew-hating won’t make much substantive difference. That said, it does feel pretty good.

And for friends of mine who bemoan that Facebook has gotten too political and should return to pictures of cats and people bragging about their ski trips, grow up. Sticking your head in the sand may work if you’re an ostrich, but not if you are an empathetic, concerned grown-up human being. Which is not to say, I don’t also enjoy your cat pictures. If you can get your feline to play the Hammond Organ, I may even share them.

Last Sunday night, after a weekend of visiting old high school friends, taking pictures of my daughter before her winter formal and seeing Rent for the first time, I was sitting on my couch watching the Pro Bowl. Now mind you, there is almost no football game I won’t watch in its entirety. Same with futbol games. But on this night, I got hit with a wicked case of the shpilkes. It didn’t feel appropriate that others were at airports around the country fighting the Muslim Ban while I loafed about watching Kirk Cousins in an exhibition game. To me, the only thing less American than discriminating by nationality is prioritizing by religion. And American Hitler’s Muslim Ban manages to do both. So I got in the car and drove to LAX. It took me two and a half hours before I could park and join my voice of dissent with the hundreds already there. But other than nearly needing to pee in a Dasani bottle while driving by the Southwest terminal, I’m glad I went.

In Trump’s America. free time may not seem free, as long as freedoms are perpetually under attack. More of our leisure time may be spent calling congressman and signing petitions and attending rallies. But ultimately, that’s a small price to pay for trying to make American great again. Or, as great as it already was three weeks ago.

– This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

familiar

Posted by dashjkehjklw on February 04, 2017
Uncategorized / No Comments

There are some amazing sculptures that we’ve seen at the museum over near . They were made very well.

cajun

Posted by dashjkehjklw on February 04, 2017
Uncategorized / No Comments

There are a lot of really exciting things to do around the new house in Each treatment has a chance of clearing the lice if administered correctly.. We have so many things to do.

Fat Shaming Can Literally Break Your Heart

Posted by dashjkehjklw on February 04, 2017
Uncategorized / No Comments

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2017/02/02/fat-shaming-hurts-heart_n_14604606.html

When it comes to the way people stigmatize different body shapes and sizes, words can hurt more than just your feelings. New research suggests they may have real health consequences.

People who reported feeling diminished by negative stereotypes about their weight were three times more likely to have a heightened risk of diabetes, heart disease and stroke than people with similar weights and mental health who did not feel affected, according to a recent study published in the journal Obesity.

“Above and beyond the effects of weight, this internalization of weight bias is associated with poor health,” the study’s lead author, Rebecca Pearl, told The Huffington Post. 

“There is this misconception that’s out there that a little bit of stigma might help to motivate people or … get people to change their health behaviors,” said Pearl, an assistant professor at the Center for Weight and Eating Disorders at the University of Pennsylvania’s Perelman School of Medicine. “That’s not the case.”

Fat shaming is bad for your health

Past studies suggest that individuals who feel shamed for their physical appearance or weight are at increased risk of depression, anxiety, body dissatisfaction and low self-esteem. Other research shows that people who are body-shamed tend to weigh more, have greater waist circumferences and a greater tendency to become obese over time ― and that people who face weight discrimination also face a higher risk of mortality over time.

This latest study is important, Pearl explained, because it suggests that fat shaming can affect health measures that are known to bring on diabetes, heart disease and stroke.

The new study included 159 overweight or obese adults, ages 21 to 65, who had signed up for a larger trial to evaluate a weight-loss maintenance program. They rated how much they felt stigmatized by weight-related stereotypes ― a measure known as weight bias internalization ― and indicated how much they agreed with statements like “My weight is a major way that I judge my value as a person” or “I feel anxious about being overweight because of what people might think of me.”

Everyone in the study also underwent a medical exam that measured blood pressure, waist circumference, triglyceride levels, HDL cholesterol and glucose. People with unhealthy measures in any three of those areas were diagnosed with metabolic syndrome (the name for a group of conditions that raise your risk of heart disease, diabetes and stroke).

The data revealed that people who reported higher levels of weight bias internalization were three times more likely to have metabolic syndrome than people who reported low levels of weight bias internalization. People who felt the most stigmatized were also six times more likely to have high triglyceride levels.

Why it’s important to call out weight bias

When people agree with harmful stereotypes about their bodies, it can really shake their confidence and their ability to make healthy changes, Pearl said.

“Given all the messages of shame and blame around weight that are out there, it’s really hard to not internalize some of these messages,” she explained.

According to Pearl, health care providers need to be sensitive about these issues when they’re counseling patients. They should pay attention to whether patients call themselves lazy or criticize themselves because of their weight, she said ― and they should find ways of supporting their patients’ health behavior goals without criticizing them.

“Weight is a complex issue,” Pearl said. “It involves biological factors, environmental factors and things that do not involve personal characteristics at all. It’s important for people to remember that weight is not a reflection of personal character.” 

Given all the messages of shame and blame around weight that are out there, it’s really hard to not internalize some of these messages.
Rebecca Pearl, Center for Weight and Eating Disorders, University of Pennsylvania

Pearl encourages people who feel stigmatized because of their weight to remind themselves how they break these stereotypes ― in school, in their careers or in their personal lives.

Setting specific, achievable, concrete goals to improve health behaviors can also help people be more confident and ignore the negative stereotypes out there, she added.

And for the public, it’s important to call out weight bias or discrimination when they see it, Pearl said.

“It is not acceptable to shame others because of their weight,” she said. “It is important to understand that obesity is not the result of laziness or a lack of individual willpower.”

More diverse, longer studies will reveal more

Pearl emphasizes that her study was relatively small, so further research with with larger, more diverse groups is needed. The majority of participants in the study were African-American women, who are not often well-represented in obesity research.

The study authors note that certain race-related factors could have affected the results, though it’s not clear how. Longitudinal studies that follow individuals over time are also needed to show whether fat-shaming makes heart disease and stroke risk factors worse.

But even with all those caveats, this study adds even more evidence that weight stigma has negative implications for health, Pearl said. 

This reporting is brought to you by HuffPost’s health and science platform, The Scope. Like us on Facebook and Twitter and tell us your story: scopestories@huffingtonpost.com.  

Sarah DiGiulio is The Huffington Post’s sleep reporter. You can contact her at sarah.digiulio@huffingtonpost.com. 

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